• SERSER
  • The Weakest Link?

    Serbian civil society as effective scrutinizer of EU accession process – constraints and opportunities

    Over the last year, it appears that the fragile culture of dialogue and recently established consultation practices between the civil society and the government (in EU accession process context) are gradually fracturing, especially when it comes to monitoring of realisation of obligations and areas pertaining to Chapters 23 and 24. As a reminder, these chapters are crucial, given that the entire accession process will be evaluated against the results achieved therein.  
    Is the current state of affairs, in relation to state-civil society cooperation, a matter of concern or does it represent a normal, temporary phase? Is civil society ample to fulfill the expected scrutinising role and act towards the public when it does not possess the necessary data that should be available as a consequence of open government? What actions do the EU institutions themselves undertake towards the public in order to increase the transparency of the accession process and instigate greater involvement of the civil society in this process? What is the fault line between the necessity for transparency and inclusiveness on the one side, and protection of secrecy in the best interest of the accession process outcome, on the other side? What are the interests that should stay away from the eyes of the public and why?

    These and other issues will be discussed by our distinguished panel of experts on the panel discussion The Weakest link? Serbian civil society as effective scrutinizer of EU accession process – constraints and opportunities, organised by European Policy Centre (CEP) in cooperation with EU info centre.

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